Out with the old, in with the new — Switching from built-in software to one awesome piece of engineering: Local (by Flywheel)

A multitude of recent developments have aided me to make a choice. Some of them are

  • Apple going for thinner, lighter instead of stronger performance, and
  • Microsoft integrating Bash into Windows 10 with WSL (Windows Subsystem for Linux)

While the new Macbook Pro is quite a feet of engineering, it is hardly Pro”. Surely intel graphics are enough for typing letters and calculating spreadsheets, it’s not Pro. A 16GB memory limit (which with the compression tech used is like 24GB for any other OS) is great for battery life, but it’s not “Pro”. The keyboard is ultra thin and has good tactile feedback, but the keys need a firm press, and travel almost nothing. Great for thinning the device, but again, not “Pro”. For the same amount of money you can buy a portable powerhouse like the Asus ROG G752vy (seen in my post about this). This one has other issues, but at least it has got awesome graphics (nVidia 980), max 64 GB RAM and a “normal” laptop keyboard.

(Yeah, I know, I KNOW, I don’t need ‘awesome graphics’ for web development, but I like to game also, and to be honest; my favorite IDE – phpStorm – DOES prefer a sturdy GPU. Don’t know why, but it runs so much better on a discrete GPU than it does on intel Graphics)

Reasons to stay with macOS are rapidly diminishing, and reasons to start using Windows again are gaining support. Since the Windows 10 Anniversary Update, Windows offers Bash and all goodness that comes with Ubuntu linux, right at your fingertips. Well, not ALL goodness, but most of it.

Continue reading “Out with the old, in with the new — Switching from built-in software to one awesome piece of engineering: Local (by Flywheel)”

Hey Siri, what do I need to do to get my development environment working again after upgrading to macOS Sierra?

Hello, macOS Sierra!

macOS… that name… so… long… ago…

It has been, what?, 11 years? 12? … System 9, that was the last OS to be called macOS. The name change does not change anything regarding the update cycle, although on one of my macs, the upgrade went horrifically bad! I ended up rebooting in Recovery mode and installing macOS from there.

For getting the development enviroment back up, not much to be done!

Apache could not find the default server certificates in

/private/etc/apache2/server.crt
so after correcting those paths in
/etc/apache2/extra/httpd-ssl.conf
and restarting Apache, all’s well!

Shell commandsudo nano /etc/apache2/extra/httpd-ssl.conf
Shell commandsudo apachectl restart

As always; feel free to comment or ask questions :)

OSX 10.10 Yosemite and iOS 8 announced

Last monday – everybody who cares knows – Apple announced the latest OS versions of OSX and iOS.

For a 10 minute breakdown, visit The Verge.

You can expect updates on all posts of the series ‘The Ultimate Development Webserver’ and ‘Handy Scripts’ where needed in the next few months (time permitting and if the beta will run stable enough inside VMWare Fusion)

Using multiple versions of SVN – automatically – transparently

[UPDATE] This post is useless when you upgrade Xcode to version 5.0. If you use version 4 or you’re using a linux environment with svn 1.6 and 1.7 simultaneously; read on :) [/UPDATE]

So you have these projects in your development tree, these are probably managed by the version of Subversion as used on your mac – which with a very high probability would be version 1.6. But now and again, you might find yourself with a Subversion 1.7 project you received from someone else. Your mac will then shout something like this;

Shell outputsvn: The path '.' appears to be part of a Subversion 1.7 or greater
working copy. Please upgrade your Subversion client to use this
working copy.

If – like me – you are NOT prepared to switch to SubVersioN 1.7 entirely, then read on :)

Continue reading “Using multiple versions of SVN – automatically – transparently”

Sending an email upon SVN-commit

When you work with a group of people on the same projects, the larger the group gets, the more difficult the task of keeping everybody informed. So why not do this automatically? Send an e-mail upon an SVN commit. Here’s how I do it. Continue reading “Sending an email upon SVN-commit”

SSL (HTTPS) on your Development WebServer

It took me a while and finally found a working, but a bit ugly, solution. Not to bore you with the details, here are the step by step instruction on how to get HTTPS working on your development web server. Please note, this is not a good setup for live web servers, you will have to take security into account if you use this on a publicly available web server. Continue reading “SSL (HTTPS) on your Development WebServer”

Handy Shell Scripts – part II – manage_launchpad.sh

The second script I’d like to share is one to list or delete items from the OSX Lion launchpad. It’s a very basic script with semi-cryptic output, but it’s useable for the two or three times you’ll ever use it.

Have you looked at your launchpad? It probably has twenty or more items you would like removed, but, …., OSX doesn’t allow you to remove items. Luckily it’s just an SQLITE database and with a few carefully built SQL queries, we can cleanup duplicates and unwanted items.

Continue reading “Handy Shell Scripts – part II – manage_launchpad.sh”

Handy Shell Scripts – part I – svntag.sh

Everyone has ’em. Well, maybe not EVERYONE, but a good many of us, programmers do; those handy little scripts and one-liners that make our jobs a little easier.

The first I’d like to share is one I use daily about a dozen times; svntag.sh
Continue reading “Handy Shell Scripts – part I – svntag.sh”