Out with the old, in with the new — Switching from built-in software to one awesome piece of engineering: Local (by Flywheel)

A multitude of recent developments have aided me to make a choice. Some of them are

  • Apple going for thinner, lighter instead of stronger performance, and
  • Microsoft integrating Bash into Windows 10 with WSL (Windows Subsystem for Linux)

While the new Macbook Pro is quite a feet of engineering, it is hardly Pro”. Surely intel graphics are enough for typing letters and calculating spreadsheets, it’s not Pro. A 16GB memory limit (which with the compression tech used is like 24GB for any other OS) is great for battery life, but it’s not “Pro”. The keyboard is ultra thin and has good tactile feedback, but the keys need a firm press, and travel almost nothing. Great for thinning the device, but again, not “Pro”. For the same amount of money you can buy a portable powerhouse like the Asus ROG G752vy (seen in my post about this). This one has other issues, but at least it has got awesome graphics (nVidia 980), max 64 GB RAM and a “normal” laptop keyboard.

(Yeah, I know, I KNOW, I don’t need ‘awesome graphics’ for web development, but I like to game also, and to be honest; my favorite IDE – phpStorm – DOES prefer a sturdy GPU. Don’t know why, but it runs so much better on a discrete GPU than it does on intel Graphics)

Reasons to stay with macOS are rapidly diminishing, and reasons to start using Windows again are gaining support. Since the Windows 10 Anniversary Update, Windows offers Bash and all goodness that comes with Ubuntu linux, right at your fingertips. Well, not ALL goodness, but most of it.

Continue reading “Out with the old, in with the new — Switching from built-in software to one awesome piece of engineering: Local (by Flywheel)”

Hey Siri, what do I need to do to get my development environment working again after upgrading to macOS Sierra?

Hello, macOS Sierra!

macOS… that name… so… long… ago…

It has been, what?, 11 years? 12? … System 9, that was the last OS to be called macOS. The name change does not change anything regarding the update cycle, although on one of my macs, the upgrade went horrifically bad! I ended up rebooting in Recovery mode and installing macOS from there.

For getting the development enviroment back up, not much to be done!

Apache could not find the default server certificates in

/private/etc/apache2/server.crt
so after correcting those paths in
/etc/apache2/extra/httpd-ssl.conf
and restarting Apache, all’s well!

Shell commandsudo nano /etc/apache2/extra/httpd-ssl.conf
Shell commandsudo apachectl restart

As always; feel free to comment or ask questions :)

Bye Bye Yosemite – Hello El Capitan! — another post-upgrade fixing session

In the series “How to fix your development environment after an upgrade” ( referring to this and this post ) I present you;

“Fix your development environment after upgrade to El Capitan”

Continue reading “Bye Bye Yosemite – Hello El Capitan! — another post-upgrade fixing session”

Another Upgrade, Another Fixing session – Upgrade Development Environment – Yosemite edition

While Redmond is starting their photocopiers (the age old story of how Microsoft keeps copying instead of innovating), we Mac users start our updates. OSX 10.10 Yosemite brings Apache 2.4 and PHP 5.5 to our playground, but not everyone is happy with that. Also, not all software survives the upgrade. Here is what I had to do to fix my development environment.

Continue reading “Another Upgrade, Another Fixing session – Upgrade Development Environment – Yosemite edition”

Test your code for PHP (in-)compatibility

PHP Upgrades are a pain in the ass but from time to time, it’s desperately needed. For a hobbyist with one or two websites, it’s not that much of a deal to check your code and update, but what if you have hundreds of websites running on your servers? Automated tools would be the better choice.

Luckily there’s PHPCS – the PHP CodeSniffer – to check your code for appliance to a certain set of coding standards.

Continue reading “Test your code for PHP (in-)compatibility”

Downgrade (or upgrade) PHP on OSX

OSX Yosemite comes with PHP 5.5. OSX Mountain Lion comes with PHP 5.3. What if you wanted to run PHP 5.4 on both? Well, you can, with a dead simple installation;

Shell commandcurl -s http://php-osx.liip.ch/install.sh | bash -s 5.4
will install PHP 5.4.

Thanks to The coolest guide on the planet.

Restore Apache2 service after removal of Server.app

After experimenting with Apples Server.App and removing it (for not really needing it) the built-in Apache was no longer functioning and all I could get out of it was; “Websites are turned off. An administrator can turn them on using the Server application.”

The fix is simple, but finding where to fix, …

Webservices Turned Off

Continue reading “Restore Apache2 service after removal of Server.app”

Repair OSX WebDevelopment server after OSX Upgrade

After upgrading OSX to version 10.9 I find myself investigating why my development server no longer works. After 4 upgrades I now have a clear list of things to check and how to fix.

If you have not yet upgraded OSX, take the time to back-up your /etc/php.ini and /etc/apache2/httpd.conf. Also; OSX 10.9 Mavericks will upgrade PHP to PHP 5.4, so if you have projects incompatible with 5.4; a) don’t upgrade OSX, b) start upgrading your code or c) use a different AMP-stack.

Also; if you depend on your computer for your income, don’t rush into this!

The TODO list:

  • Backup your system
  • Upgrade OSX
  • Upgrade Xcode and run it at least once, installing the commandline tools
  • Reboot your system
  • Follow the checklist :)

The checklist (things to check and maybe fix):

  • Apache
  • PHP
  • MySQL
  • PEAR/PECL/other

Continue reading “Repair OSX WebDevelopment server after OSX Upgrade”

Sending an email upon SVN-commit

When you work with a group of people on the same projects, the larger the group gets, the more difficult the task of keeping everybody informed. So why not do this automatically? Send an e-mail upon an SVN commit. Here’s how I do it. Continue reading “Sending an email upon SVN-commit”

Javascript callbacks and the “this” object.

I spent hours and hours googling for this and the word “this” being a very common word made it impossible to find the answer.

The question was; how do I use the “this” context-object in my own callback function. It turns out it’s very simple, but the trick is, of course, to know the answer to know it’s simple.

Continue reading “Javascript callbacks and the “this” object.”